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Groundwater: Cities, Suburbs, and Growth Areas Remedying the Past and Managing for the Future

Groundwater: Cities, Suburbs, and Growth Areas  Remedying the Past and Managing for the Future

Large metropolitan areas around the world are facing a wide variety of critical groundwater and water supply issues — a subject to be addressed in a two-day conference August 8-9 in Los Angeles hosted by the National Ground Water Association.

The conference, Groundwater: Cities, Suburbs, and Growth Areas — Remedying the Past and Managing for the Future, is expected to draw professionals internationally.

NGWA is currently accepting abstract submissions, which are due April 21 by 11:59 p.m. ET. (Extended abstracts are due July 8.)

Those who should attend include:
City and municipal planning discipline professionals
City, county, and local administrators, including mayors
Developers
Power generators and water utilities
Stormwater and wastewater professionals
Policymakers (at all levels of government)
Economists
Consulting and engineering firms
Chambers of commerce/industry
Regulators
Bankers (including USDA banking arm)
Academics
Transportation professionals.
Among the questions to be explored at the conference are:
How do cities and the surrounding areas maintain or expand water supplies?
How do they address public sanitation and damaged infrastructure?
How do they manage stormwater, if at all?

How is groundwater protection and recharge being addressed in their planning efforts?

What is the state of groundwater in urban and surrounding areas in terms of groundwater supply and sustainability, and what actions are being taken to ensure integrity of the resource?

What are the stresses on groundwater in suburban growth areas where new homes rely predominantly on private wells?

How does construction dewatering, quarrying, and other geotechnical activities interact and affect groundwater in urban and suburban areas?

How can sustainable systems be financed?

To learn more about this course, as well as the many other NGWA educational programs, click on the "Events/Education" menu tab above or call 800 551.7379 (614 898.7791).

__________________

NGWA, a nonprofit organization composed of 12,000 U.S. and international groundwater professionals — contractors, equipment manufacturers, suppliers, scientists, and engineers — is dedicated to advancing groundwater knowledge. NGWA’s vision is to be the leading groundwater association that advocates the responsible development, management, and use of water.

 

 
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