Slideshow image
   
becpl
Mfg. of Water well Drilling Rigs, Dth Hammers and Button Bits...
 
phe
Water Well Drilling Rigs, Dth Drilling Rigs, Rotary Drilling Rigs...
 
phe
Blast hole Drills, Water Well Drilling Rig, Mud Pumps, Vertical Turbine Pumps...
klrsai deepagetechjcr
 

Are your wells going dry?

SEBRING - When one of his wells quit pumping last Friday, Chuck Domm had no drinking water.
Five days later, the 250-foot well was still not functioning. The Lorida resident blames the water table levels being sapped dry by the current drought for his water woes.


He called Pete Eveleth Well Drilling about the problem.
"We have the lowest water tables that we've had in several years," said JoAnn Eveleth, whose husband has operated the drilling company for about 35 years.
Owners of two other wells in Avon Park have called the Highlands County Health Department in the past several weeks concerned that their wells might go dry, said Janelle Bourgoin, environmental specialist II. Bourgoin's department monitors some wells in the area.

Large wells in the area are functioning but it is evident that their water levels have gone down, said South Florida Water Management District Spokesman Randy
 
Drilling Today Contact

Smith. SFWMD monitors large wells like utility wells through the south and east portions of the county.
"People can look at the lakes behind their houses and see that the levels are a lot lower," Smith said. "There's a lot of evaporation on hot, cloudless days with no rainfall. Underground it's the same thing. It's important to remind people that our water supply is 100 percent dependent on rain."
And that rain might not happen for several weeks.
The area is in a moderate to severe drought, said Ernie Jillson, meteorologist with the National Weather Service. The seven-day forecast includes very little chance of rain. Whatever moisture comes down from above "wouldn't sink into the water table," Jillson said.

 

While the rainfall levels do affect the underground aquifers, it's not a direct inch-for-inch effect, Smith said. Aquifers are underground layers of rock and sand that hold water. In Southwest Florida, more than 80 percent of the water supply comes from aquifers, according to information from the Southwest Florida Water Management District Web site.
SWFMUD, which covers the other part of Highlands County, also has not received any calls about dry wells, said Robyn Felix, media relations manager.
Felix said it's important to remember that May is the last month of the dry season. The area gets 60 percent of its annual rainfall from June through September.
"That's when everything gets filled up," she said. "It's going to take an above-average rainfall for an extended period of time for water resources to recover and for us to be out of the drought."
On Tuesday, owner James R. Swindle Jr. of J.R.S. Well Drilling & Irrigation was busy working on a well off of Hammock Road in Sebring.
Swindle said droughts like this one are more likely to affect shallow wells like the one he was working on, which was about 25 feet deep.
"Twenty-foot wells are very common here," Swindle said. "This county has more wells than any other county I've ever been in. The deeper the well, the better off everyone will be."
If a well has gone dry, call the SWFMUD at 863-534-1448. Felix said the district would send staff to look at the well and make recommendations.
For more information or questions about water quality, call the county environmental health department at 863-382-7219.

SEBRING - When one of his wells quit pumping last Friday, Chuck Domm had no drinking water.
Five days later, the 250-foot well was still not functioning. The Lorida resident blames the water table levels being sapped dry by the current drought for his water woes.
He called Pete Eveleth Well Drilling about the problem.
"We have the lowest water tables that we've had in several years," said JoAnn Eveleth, whose husband has operated the drilling company for about 35 years.
Owners of two other wells in Avon Park have called the Highlands County Health Department in the past several weeks concerned that their wells might go dry, said Janelle Bourgoin, environmental specialist II. Bourgoin's department monitors some wells in the area.

Large wells in the area are functioning but it is evident that their water levels have gone down, said South Florida Water Management District Spokesman Randy Smith. SFWMD monitors large wells like utility wells through the south and east portions of the county.
"People can look at the lakes behind their houses and see that the levels are a lot lower," Smith said. "There's a lot of evaporation on hot, cloudless days with no rainfall. Underground it's the same thing. It's important to remind people that our water supply is 100 percent dependent on rain."
And that rain might not happen for several weeks.
The area is in a moderate to severe drought, said Ernie Jillson, meteorologist with the National Weather Service. The seven-day forecast includes very little chance of rain. Whatever moisture comes down from above "wouldn't sink into the water table," Jillson said.
While the rainfall levels do affect the underground aquifers, it's not a direct inch-for-inch effect, Smith said. Aquifers are underground layers of rock and sand that hold water. In Southwest Florida, more than 80 percent of the water supply comes from aquifers, according to information from the Southwest Florida Water Management District Web site.
SWFMUD, which covers the other part of Highlands County, also has not received any calls about dry wells, said Robyn Felix, media relations manager.
Felix said it's important to remember that May is the last month of the dry season. The area gets 60 percent of its annual rainfall from June through September.
"That's when everything gets filled up," she said. "It's going to take an above-average rainfall for an extended period of time for water resources to recover and for us to be out of the drought."
On Tuesday, owner James R. Swindle Jr. of J.R.S. Well Drilling & Irrigation was busy working on a well off of Hammock Road in Sebring.
Swindle said droughts like this one are more likely to affect shallow wells like the one he was working on, which was about 25 feet deep.
"Twenty-foot wells are very common here," Swindle said. "This county has more wells than any other county I've ever been in. The deeper the well, the better off everyone will be."
If a well has gone dry, call the SWFMUD at 863-534-1448. Felix said the district would send staff to look at the well and make recommendations.
For more information or questions about water quality, call the county environmental health department at 863-382-7219.

Drilling Today Contact